Employment Laws: Employer’s Perspective Part 1

Copy of Employement Law_ Employees Perspective
16 Apr
2019

Starting a business is not an easy task. There are many legal, financial, and personal hurdles you need to overcome before launching a successful business. With legal issues, you have to not only focus on the immediate preparations but you also have to prepare for future situations. Many businesses, when they become successful, hire employees to help with the incoming waves of work. The business needs to protect themselves with clearly written contracts that help not only the business but also the employees. Whether the business is a fresh new startup or an established company, you will want to seek legal advice to draft employment contracts containing necessary clauses.

 

Restraint of trade clause

This clause will protect the employer’s interests after an employee leaves the current company. The two main types that are included are non-competition and non-clauses. It restricts employees from using confidential information and trade secrets from the previous company, working for a competitor after a certain period of time, and stealing customers or staff from their previous employer.

 

Annual Leave

This allows employees to be paid while taking time off of work. Based on ordinary work hours, full-time and part-time employees get four weeks of annual leave. Annual leave accumulates from the first day the employee is employed. Figuring out the correct way to calculate the annual leave of your employees can ensure future success if a situation comes up.

 

Sick or Carer’s Leave

Sick leave is when an employee takes paid time off because of an illness or injury. Carer’s leave is to take care of or support a family member or member of their household when they’re sick or has an unexpected emergency occur. It should be noted employees may have to give notice or even evidence of their sick or carer’s leave. Like annual leave, employees start accumulating sick and carer’s leave during the beginning of their employment.

 

Probation

Employers have the right to put their employees on a probationary period to assess if the employee is suitable for the position in the company. During the probationary period, employees will receive the same benefits as an employee not on the probation period. If an employee doesn’t pass the evaluation during the probationary period, they will receive notice when their employment will end and the accumulated annual leave hours that will be paid out.

 

**This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be legal advice. In relation to your individual situation, always seek advice specific to your circumstances from a lawyer.

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